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20130104
20130112
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CSPAN 3
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KQED (PBS) 2
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Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
the taliban renouncing terrorism, without them recognizing the afghan constitution, and recognizing that if there are changes they want to make to how the afghan government operates, then there is an orderly constitutional process to do that, and that you cannot resort to violence. the afghan constitution protects the rights of afghan women. and the united states strongly believes that afghanistan cannot succeed unless it gives opportunity to its women. we believe that a about 3 -- we believe that about every country in the world. we will continue to voice very strongly support for the afghan constitution as protection for minorities, its protection of women, and we think that a failure to provide that protection not only will make reconciliation impossible to achieve, but also would make afghanistan's long term development impossible to achieve. the single best indicator or one of the single best indicators of a country's prosperity around the world is how does it treats its women. does it educate that half of the population? does it give an opportunity? when it does, you will poli
in the head by taliban militants because she demanded equal education for girls in pakistan, here is better news. nearly three months later she is walking out of a hospital and looking healthy and happy. matthew chance has more in this report. >> reporter: holding the hand of a nurse, malala made her own way out of the hospital where she has been treated for her truittmatic injuries and managed to wave at staff as she was discharged. a hospital statement said she is a strong young woman and has worked hard with the people caring for her to make excellent progress in her recovery. doctors say she may benefit from being with her family but may need to be readmitted for reconstructive surgery on her skull. from the age of 11 malala has been an outspoken campaigner for female education in pakistan criticizing the taliban who ban schooling for girls. she was shot in the head and neck in october after her school bus was stopped by taliban gun men who demanded the other children identify her. the attack outraged pakistan provoking cause for a crack down on ilitants and made malala an international
at the "morning papers." "the washington post." the cia has started off 2013 by using drones to bomb taliban targets in pakistan on 7 of the last 10 days. analysts say the uptick in air attacks is a move to weaken the taliban's hold on the region ahead of coalition troop withdrawals in 2014. >>> and "the washington post," the pentagon is preparing for a worst-case scenario in which lawmakers failed to make its march 1st deadline on the budget deal. that would mean deep, across-the-board cuts including $500 million less for the defense department. leon panetta says it would be a huge setback for national security. >>> "the wall street journal," american express is set to cut 5,400 jobs. the company will slash 8.5% of its staff, mostly from its travel division which has lost business in the advent of internet travel sites. >>> this weekend's "parade" magazine, it's the savings issue. inside, a guide to saving $10,000 this year. >> did you hear that? you can save money. >> that's a good investment because that "parade" doesn't cost that much. so you can save. that's kind of a no-brainer. >> the
negotiating power with the taliban. >> the position we take in showing that we are going to continue to complete this mission, the better the chances we have to ultimately achieve political reconciliation. >> the pentagon was only the beginning of the afghan president's visit to washington. >> our meeting, i believe, helped -- will help lay the ground work for president karzai's discussions tomorrow with president obama. >> sources say president karzai and his defense minister brought a wish list to the pentagon, drones, helicopters, and hardware to support their security forces. >> what we talked about yesterday was, you know, let's move beyond a wish list of equipment. >> the u.s. want assurances the terrorists won't set up troops in afghanistan after the troops leave. karzai agreed. >> be able to provide security to these people. >> but a recent pentagon reports that the afghan border patrol relies on the u.s. for even its most basic needs, food and water. it's rife with illiteracy, lack of accountability, and corruption. and these conditions are expected to endure beyond 2014. bu
. this is some of the problems we have seen. it did not want to narrowly cover just the al qaeda and taliban but could be expanded for whoever the president decides is the enemy. it's troubling. we would be put in a position that we can argue we've reached the end. the last 11 years have shown there's a lot of institutional push for this war to be over with. >> the gentleman over here. >> i'm from the german embassy. my name is joseph. i have a question that may be hypothetical. what would happen if president obama would decide tomorrow to close down guantanamo. he as commander-in-chief, if he would do this, what would happen? could congress or anyone block it? if you make this decision tomorrow, what would happen? >> well, there are practical problems now with where the people can go. so it takes work to get it so you can empty the people out of guantanamo. you really need to open it up so people can come to the united states, certain ones of them, and make it easier for them to go to a third country. -it is a. light- and i go back to lincoln. lincoln could not just say i'm not going to all
that are the taliban and al qaeda. we have an unreliable ally in president karzai, he is erratic and this will cause him to be even more erratic and our own ally will be looking at us and saying, no, where is the united states going. no, judy, i think this was a highly injudicious statement. >> celeste ward gventer, an injudicious statement and bad idea? >> well i have the greatest respect for bing west and i'm honored to be on the show with him but i respectfully disagree. for us to be talking about troop levels right now putting the cart before the horse in any case. because frankly we should be talking about our vision for the region strategically. in any event we still need consider that having no troops there is a real option, and i think to ignore that option would be strategically foolish. we heard about the supposed apandora's box lips that was coming if u.s. troops left iraq. u.s. troops left iraq and the apocalypse has not arrive. that is an option for us and it would be irresponsible for us not to consider it. >> bing west, what is the argument for keeping a significant contingent of troo
our country. at the same time, we pushed the taliban out of their strongholds. today, most major cities and afghans are more security and insurgents have continued to lose territory. meanwhile, afghan forces continue to grow stronger. as planned, some 352,000 afghan soldiers and police are now in training or are on duty. most missions are already being led by afghan forces. and of all the men and women in uniform in afghanistan, the vast majority are afghans who are fighting and dying for their country everyday. we still face significant challenges, but because of this progress, our transition is on track. at the nato summit last year wing a e greed with the coalition forces that afghan forces will take the lead for security in mid-2013. president karzai and the team have been here for several days, and we have shared a vision of how to move ahead and consulted with our coalition partners, and we will continue to do so, and today, with we agreed as afghan forces take the lead, and as president karzai announces the final phase of the transition, coalition forces will move to a sup
and taliban and associated forces so that not only -- >> associated doing a lot of work there? >> it is. and the other thing that's doing a lot of work is substantially supported. anybody who substantially supported these forces is subject to indefinite detention which is not something that you would get if you went back and read the authorization for use and military force from 2001, which describes a narrower set of people, frankly. >> so we've actually expanded? >> legislatively, yes. in some ways, this bill was basically codifying what the lower courts have been doing. >> have allowed. >> have alouds. >> the supreme court hadn't weighed in on whether this is okay. will it? i don't know. >> let me ask you this, ben, the naacp is not an institution that's focused on national security issues, for understandable reasons but i wonder sometimes and i'm not someone that welcome i don't myself, that's not the thing i spend most of my time reading about but i wonder if when you think about this stuff, the role of an organization like naacp to weigh in on this stuff partly because of the hist
's just farewell. she'll be back in about a month to have the area in her skull rebuilt where a taliban gunman fired a bullet into her head. when cbs news visited the site of the attack in rural pakistan the bus was parked with evidence but police have still not caught the gunman. meanwhile malala's classmates at a school run by her father went back to their studies immediately, determined not to be intimidated by violence waiting and still hoping for malala to go home. >> i think once she goes back she'll be a huge personality in her own right and she'll continue to promote the work she's doing. >> but malala won't be returning to pakistan any time soon. she's got many hours of healing and therapy to do which she'll do in her temporary home in britain surrounded by her family. the british and pakistani governments have worked very hard to give the family a stable base here as long as they need it. in fact, the pakistani government even gave her father a temporary diplomatic job. it was named education attachÉ to the consult in birmingham. anthony? >> elizabeth,
around in afghanistan when they were hunting the taliban. >> right. >> will you just give us an insight on the problems that we face getting rid of, you know, these magazine clips where you can, you know, shoot off, you know, dozens of bullets in seconds? and some of these assault weapons that, again, are made for one reason and one reason only, to kill as many human beings as quickly as possible. talk about the challenges. because i know there are 40 democrats in the house that are going to fight getting rid of assault weapons. of course, most of the republicans are going to fight it. what's the great challenge there? >> i think that you're right, joe, and general mcchrystal was right, these are weapons of war. they are not weapons that you go hunting with or really that you can protect yourself with. you know, there is going to be a discussion. you know, starting today, we're going to hear it from governor cuomo. the vice president's having a series of meetings today. he's going to come out with a series of proposals very soon. assault weapons will most likely be part of that. we had
, that the afghan forces will not hang on to, sell it to, or have it capturedded from them by the taliban, and is it being a risk that what mite up in the hands of the haqqani network or potentially al al-qaa related groups? >> well, the defense secretary gave some information to the house in november about plans on this. he said the intense is to extract all equipment whose value to the arms forces is an extraction and recooperation. reallily, that is, you would expect that to include or have sophisticated equipment, but if we hope we do the southern route, pakistan, but we are negotiating northern rotes in kazakhstan and russia, but we can also bring equipment out by air, and as things stand now r there are no firm plans to leave equipment behind. there is no decisions to leave behind equipment x in afghanistan. if we do that, all relevant issues have to be looked at, but i think we should. if left to the afghan courses, we regard it in the same way. >> will export lines have to be issued for goods that are gifted, and will there be a need of approval for any such equipment? >> there's
of the taliban or some al qaeda believe the group's? >> the defense secretary give some information to the house and did in november about our plans on this. he told the house our intention is to respect all the equipment is the lead to the armed forces is greater than the cost of extraction. and recuperation. you would expect that to include woodall sophisticated -- inc lude with all sophisticated equipment. the can -- we can also bring some equipment out by air. there are no plans currently to leave any equipment behind. if we do that, all the relevant issues will have to be looked at -- but we will be regarded the and the the same way. >> will export licenses have to be issued? will there be a need for parliamentary approval be? >> every opportunity -- >> the equipment from the uk requires an export license. if the gift is above a certain by a, they are called in advance -- certain value, they are called in advance. >> i think it will be revisiting this issue. >> i'm sure. >> coming now to argentina. >> the cake government introduce restrictions -- the uk government introduced restrictions. i
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)